Damian Lewis
"actor, dad, redhead and ping pong champion"
Categories Homeland Media Personal and Family Life Print Media

Damian Lewis: Homeland’s Dark Heart, Men’s Journal, July 2013

Damian Lewis, the Dark Heart of Homeland

by 

Photograph by Mark Seliger

There are 316 million people in the United States of America. About six million of them watch ‘Homeland,’ Showtime’s thriller about world terror, paranoia, and bipolar disorder. That’s about 2 percent of the population; roughly what the guy with the beard running on the Libertarian Party ticket gets when he runs for Congress. Continue reading Damian Lewis: Homeland’s Dark Heart, Men’s Journal, July 2013

Categories Media Personal and Family Life Print Media Stolen

Damian Lewis: I split my eye open while duelling with Ralph Fiennes, Metro, June 21, 2011

Original article at Metro, corrected here for many technical typos

Actor Damian Lewis talks to Metro about the worst job he’s ever had, starring in a musical and anti-ginger prejudice. The 40-year-old stars in the forthcoming BBC drama Stolen.

Continue reading Damian Lewis: I split my eye open while duelling with Ralph Fiennes, Metro, June 21, 2011

Categories Band of Brothers Keane Media Print Media Richard Winters The Forsyte Saga

Damian Lewis: Cherwell Salutes You – May 11, 2011

Damian Lewis: Cherwell Salutes You

Damian Lewis is making me a cup of tea. Dressed in Ugg boots, a checked shirt and a stylish knit cardigan, he’s every inch the metrosexual, cool guy about town: down with the kids in more ways than one, he has to head off after the interview to read his children a bedtime story.

Continue reading Damian Lewis: Cherwell Salutes You – May 11, 2011

Categories Media Print Media The Baker

Move over Coen Brothers for the new kids on the set, Western Mail, May 6, 2006

Move over Coen Brothers for the new kids on the set

by Claire Hill, Western Mail, May 6, 2006

Move over the Coen Brothers, there’s a new film making duo in town, and this time they’re Welsh. Actor Damian Lewis has teamed up with his baby brother Gareth to make their first film together. Claire Hill joined them on location in their beloved Wales

DAMIAN LEWIS’S legs are half sticking out of a makeshift vent shaft as the actor attaches knee pads underneath his all- black ensemble.

A gun is visible and is just peeping out from the band of his trousers. Next to his feet, rolls of silver gaffer tape and wires are scattered on the floor. Directly in front of him, in the old paper mill, tucked at the back of a Cardiff industrial estate, someone fashions a gun holster out of an old yoga mat.

The film clapper board reads Roll 46, Slate 74, Take 1 and the rest of the 40-strong crew are getting ready for a scene rehearsal.

The Welsh actor’s key role in this scene is to crawl through the painted silver boxes and make it look as if he is scrabbling through the vents of a ceiling shaft.

And, he has to do all of this while holding a gun, a motive in his mind and a sense of ennui about his current situation in life. Impossible? That’s acting for you, darling. Continue reading Move over Coen Brothers for the new kids on the set, Western Mail, May 6, 2006

Categories Band of Brothers Dreamcatcher Interviews Media Print Media The Forsyte Saga

Guardian Interview: Shooting Star – March 10, 2002

Shooting star

by Jay Rayner | The Guardian | 

Watching Damian Lewis leading the men of Easy Company to victory in Spielberg’s WWII epic Band of Brothers, you’d never guess he went to Eton and attended drama school with Ewan MacGregor. Now, though, he is returning to more familiar territory as the iconic Soames in The Forsyte Saga.

The middle-aged Italian waitress clearly does not recognise the actor she is shouting at or, if she does, she has had enough experience at being a sour-faced waitress not to show it. This is the second time she has asked Damian Lewis to choose what he wants for lunch and it is the second time he has asked for a few more minutes. ‘Look,’ she says, with a fearsome shrug, arms spread wide. ‘We are busy. You don’t order now, then the kitchen, it become busy. You wait too long for your food. You get cross.’ There is a convincing logic here: the small, smokey cafe in London’s St James’s is indeed already crammed with people.

Continue reading Guardian Interview: Shooting Star – March 10, 2002