Damian Lewis
Actor, Dad, Redhead, and Ping Pong Champion
Categories Media Print Media The Situation

Beyond The Multiplex, Salon, February 1, 2007

Beyond the Multiplex

by Andrew O’Hehir, Salon.com, February 1, 2007

A compelling Iraq war thriller that will entertain and upset you.

“There’s no truth, you know,” a CIA official tells an idealistic young colleague in “The Situation,” the compelling new Iraq war thriller from veteran indie director Philip Haas. “There are no bad guys and there are no good guys. It’s not gray, either … There’s no truth! It’s lost in the fourth dimension of time.”

Those lines, and the extraordinary monologue by Dan Murphy (played by Damian Lewis) from which they come, express the ambiguity at the heart of “The Situation,” an uneven but impressively ambitious picture that depicts the contemporary Iraq conflict as an existential and moral heart of darkness. Made rapidly and on the cheap (in Morocco), and written by Wendell Steavenson, a journalist who has reported from Iraq, “The Situation” claims the prize of being the first American narrative feature to address the war directly. (Perhaps 20 percent of Irwin Winkler’s “Home of the Brave” is set in Iraq, but that film is principally about soldiers’ difficulties on coming home.) Continue reading Beyond The Multiplex, Salon, February 1, 2007

Categories Media Print Media The Situation

Situation No Win, Village Voice, January 30, 2007

Situation No Win

by J. Hoberman, Village Voice, January 30, 2007

Dealing head-on with Bush’s War, Samarra-set political thriller dissects Iraqi unrest and nails the neocons

The Situation, Philip Haas’s deftly paced, well-written, and brilliantly infuriating Iraq War thriller is not only the strongest of recent geopolitical hotspot flicks but one that has been designed for maximal agitation. Based on a script by the Anglo-American journalist Wendell Steavenson, this gutsy attempt to dramatize the way Iraqis live now is an incitement to rage and despair—the most vivid critique of Bush’s War yet put on screen. Continue reading Situation No Win, Village Voice, January 30, 2007

Categories Print Media Voice Work

AUDIO CLIP: James Bond Voice Work – Nov 2006

James Bond Short Stories

by Blabbertalk.com – November, 2006
Damian read a James Bond short story on BBC Radio 2 called From a View to a Kill, about a dispatch motorcycle rider on his way to British Secret Service HQ, is shot and killed and his Intelligence documents are stolen. James Bond is sent to investigate. Near the crash scene he uncovers an underground Russian agent hideout. Disguised as a dispatch rider, he shoots his Russian tail and takes his place. As he exposes the whole spy operation, his life is saved by Mary Ann who turns up at the end with men from the St. Germain station.
Listen to Damian read From a View to a Kill by Ian Fleming here.

James Bond Short Stories

Read the rest of the original article at Blabbertalk
Additional Source: BBC News

Categories Keane Media Print Media

Red Hot: The Irresistible Rise of Damian Lewis – Sept 8, 2006

Damian Lewis: The Chameleon Performer

by Liz Hoggard | The Independent | September 8, 2006

Damian Lewis is an intense chap, capable of conveying a huge range of emotions with the smallest gesture. He’s hotly tipped for an Oscar for his new film. And he’s a real gent. Just don’t call him posh, whatever you do.

“Ask him about that intense thing he does with his eyes,” a female journalist suggested when she heard I was interviewing the actor Damian Lewis. What’s striking about Lewis is how much he manages to convey by doing so very little. There is stillness about him on screen, a faraway look that can evoke anger or desire or – if you saw his rollicking performance as Benedict in BBC1’s modern-day version of Much Ado about Nothing – sheer hilarity.

The press love to brand Lewis as an arrogant posh boy. Like David Cameron, he went to Eton. But, among his generation of actors, no one does grief and repressed emotion so well. In Spielberg’s Second World War epic, Band of Brothers, he played an American soldier facing up to fear with a quiet certainty (it won him a Golden Globe nomination). He was the bewildered newlywed who doesn’t understand why his marriage is falling apart in Hearts and Bones. And in the remake of The Forsyte Saga, he did the unthinkable – making the brutal Soames sympathetic.

For several years now, 35-year-old Lewis has been a successful actor on the verge of becoming a major star. Unlike Ewan McGregor or Joseph Fiennes, his contemporaries at London’s Guildhall drama school, you might still walk past him in the street. But all that should change with the release of his new film Keane: his performance is already sparking Oscar rumours in the States.

Continue reading Red Hot: The Irresistible Rise of Damian Lewis – Sept 8, 2006

Categories Keane Media Print Media

Keane: It’s all in the Mind, The Guardian, September 1, 2006

It’s all in the mind

by Jessica Winter, The Guardian, September 1, 2006
Damian Lewis has taken on what may be his most ambitious role yet: a mentally ill father. He tells Jessica Winter how he spent time in a support home to prepare for the making of Keane.

The stars of what was meant to be Lodge Kerrigan’s third film, In God’s Hands, might have been happy enough with the shoot – Maggie Gyllenhaal and Peter Sarsgaard became a couple as result of working together – but the director wasn’t. The completed film was scrapped in 2002, owing to what Kerrigan describes as “technical issues with the negative”.

“It was pretty devastating,” says Kerrigan matter-of-factly in his rich baritone. Some others associated with the film absolved themselves of any responsibility, and Kerrigan retreated to reading the novels of Haruki Murakami. Fortunately, the insurance covered the disaster and in 2004 Kerrigan was able to return to the fray, shooting his new film, Keane, in 32 days for less than $1m.

Continue reading Keane: It’s all in the Mind, The Guardian, September 1, 2006

Categories Helen Media Personal and Family Life Print Media

Great Expectations: An Interview with Helen McCrory – August 25, 2006

Drama Queen

by Lydia Slater | Evening Standard Magazine | August 25, 2006

Perched on a velvet sofa in the elegant sitting room of the Cheyne Walk Brasserie, Helen McCrory strokes her Stella McCartney-clad stomach and smiles under heavy eyelids, rather like the cat who’s got the cream. As well she might. Life has never seemed to be particularly tough for McCrory, 37, who has been winning plaudits for her acting ever since she took her first role in the National Theatre’s production of Trelawney of the Wells, and who is constantly tipped as the next Judi Dench.

But even by her own high standards, the future is looking pretty rosy. She is eight months pregnant with her first child, and has an unnervingly perfect celebrity bump – no fat ankles or swollen face, just a watermelon at the waistline and a correspondingly magnificent bronzed cleavage. “I’ve never worn so many low-cut dresses in my life. If I could just wear spangles, I would. I feel so amazingly attractive,” she gurgles throatily, with total justice if our young waiter’s saucer eyes are anything to go by.

McCrory doesn’t appear to notice him but then if you’re engaged to Damian Lewis, star of The Forsyte Saga and Band of Brothers (and arguably the sexiest redhead on the planet), waiters probably come rather low in the pecking order. “I’ve never been broody before, but when I met Damian I became very different about relationships,” she says.

Continue reading Great Expectations: An Interview with Helen McCrory – August 25, 2006

Categories Media Print Media The Baker

Move Over Coen Brothers For the New Kids on the Set

Lewis Filming Duo

by Claire Hill | Western Mail | May 6, 2006

Move over the Coen Brothers, there’s a new film making duo in town, and this time they’re Welsh. Actor Damian Lewis has teamed up with his baby brother Gareth to make their first film together. Claire Hill joined them on location in their beloved Wales

Damian Lewis’s legs are half sticking out of a makeshift vent shaft as the actor attaches knee pads underneath his all- black ensemble.

A gun is visible and is just peeping out from the band of his trousers. Next to his feet, rolls of silver gaffer tape and wires are scattered on the floor. Directly in front of him, in the old paper mill, tucked at the back of a Cardiff industrial estate, someone fashions a gun holster out of an old yoga mat.

Continue reading Move Over Coen Brothers For the New Kids on the Set

Categories Media Print Media The Baker

The fabulous ‘Baker’ boys, This is Herefordshire, April 28, 2006

The fabulous `Baker’ boys

TWO members of the cast and crew currently filming The Baker in Grosmont are having the time of their lives. Because the star and co-producer of the film is Damian Lewis (Band of Brothers, The Forsyte Saga, Friends and Crocodiles) and the writer/director is his younger brother, Gareth, directing his first feature film.

The relationship meant there wasn’t the usual getting-to-know the director, though learning to take instruction from a younger sibling called for a slight adjustment.

“It’s a great feeling to be working with Gareth as one of his producers,” Damian said as shooting began. “I am just getting my head around being bossed about by him as one of his actors.”

Spending time with his brother is the cherry on the The Baker’s cake for Damian. “I’m loving spending time with him, just loving it. Continue reading The fabulous ‘Baker’ boys, This is Herefordshire, April 28, 2006

Categories Media Print Media The Baker

Village life just perfect for movie brothers, This is Gwent, April 24, 2006

 Village life just perfect for movie brothers

by Hannah Mlatem, This is Gwent, April 24, 2006

Film star Damian Lewis took a break from shooting his latest movie to speak to reporter Hannah Mlatem about brotherly love and his Welsh roots

THE tiny Monmouthshire village of Grosmont is hardly used to the glare of publicity.

But it was thrust under the spotlight when a touch of Hollywood glamour turned up in the hamlet, which consists of little more than a pub, church, a castle, and a handful of houses.

Actor Damian Lewis – star of Band of Brothers and Dreamcatcher – is currently there filming his latest movie, The Baker, which is directed by his brother, Gareth.

Continue reading Village life just perfect for movie brothers, This is Gwent, April 24, 2006

Categories Media Print Media The Baker

Band of Brothers 2: This time it’s personal, The Times, April 20, 2006

Band of brothers 2: this time it’s personal

by Kevin Maher, The Times, April 20, 2006

Kevin Maher discovers why Damian Lewis got on really well with the director of his new film

Damian Lewis  is jumping out of his skin. On the Cardiff set of the high concept dramedy The Baker, the 35-year-old great white hope of British screen acting has just been prematurely peppered by a troika of explosive squibs that have shredded the back of his black leather armchair and sent him to the floor of a slickly designed loft apartment.

“Er, think the timing was a bit off there,” whispers one of the concerned grips while Lewis, who famously starred in the Spielberg-produced TV series Band of Brothers, is dusted down and readied for another heart-stopping take.

Continue reading Band of Brothers 2: This time it’s personal, The Times, April 20, 2006

Categories Media Print Media The Baker

Lewis mixes Gambon into ‘Baker’, Variety, March 24, 2006

Lewis mixes Gambon into ‘Baker’

Damian Lewis produces brother Gareth’s pic

LONDON — “Harry Potter” star Michael Gambon has joined the cast of comedy “The Baker,” which is the feature debut for writer-director Gareth Lewis.

Gareth’s brother, Damian Lewis (“Stormbreaker”) plays Milo in the pic, about a hit man who flees his overlords when he can’t go through with a whack. Milo hides out in a remote Welsh village and works as a baker. He soon falls for local vet (Kate Ashfield) but cannot escape his past.

Read the rest of the article here.

Categories Fashion and Style Friends & Crocodiles Pillars of the Community Print Media

Guardian Interview: It’s a Wrap

From Fendi to Gucci and Armani Inbetween

by Hadley Freeman | The Guardian | March 3, 2006

Actor Damian Lewis has shone on screen – but can he take centre stage in this season’s patterned shirts? Hadley Freeman asks him.

‘You’re making me trendy, aren’t you?” the actor Damian Lewis accuses us, with the cheeky smile of a man fond of being the centre of attention. “My God, the Guardian is going to make me trendy!” This extraordinary sentence is prompted by an equally extraordinary garment: a short-sleeved, button-down shirt by Fendi, seared down the front with chunky red and blue stripes and a most alarming chain print. It is, to my eyes, the spit of the sort of top my 90-year-old grandfather used to wear on the golf course in Miami. Lewis looks up for reassurance. I, with my usual photogenic tact, curl my left upper lip, scrunch my nose and shake my head. But Clare, the stylist, is adamant it will work – “you know, with a jacket” – and Lewis regards her suspiciously.

Lewis, 34, is one of Britain’s hardest working and highest profile actors. He is fitting in this shoot between international promotional tours for Stephen Poliakoff’s television drama Friends And Crocodiles, acting in the Ibsen play Pillars of the Community at the National Theatre, and preparations for producing his first feature film.

Since being nominated for a Golden Globe for his role in Band Of Brothers, he has played an impressively diverse range of characters, including Soames in The Forsyte Saga, Jeffrey Archer in Jeffrey Archer: The Truth, and Benedick in the BBC’s modern adaptation of Much Ado About Nothing. But he is probably most recognisable for the fiery patch of splendid ginger hair, an attribute that increasingly dictates his wardrobe as he gets older: “I used not to care at all and wear pinks and greens, and that’s so clichéd – red hair, green clothes. Now I tend to stick with dark colours,” he says, plucking at his dark blue Gucci (“but understated!”) shirt.

Continue reading Guardian Interview: It’s a Wrap