Categories Gallery Helen Personal and Family Life

Celebration of Helen McCrory’s Life

Remembering Helen

by Gingersnap | damian-lewis.com | May 20, 2022

According to a tweet by theatre critic Dom Cavendish, Damian hosted a memorial service at St. Paul’s Church, Covent Garden (aka The Actors’ Church) in London Friday, May 20, 2022, to celebrate Helen McCrory’s life and her formidable personality. There was laughter, tears and a standing ovation in Helen’s honor. Attendees included Helena Bonham Carter, Allie Esiri, Ralph Fiennes, Benedict Cumberbatch, Eddie Redmayne, Natascha McElhone, Bob Geldoff, Rory Kinnear, Mark Strong, Joe Cole, Finn Cole, Matthew Macfadyen and Keeley Hawesdeath. Mark Strong led the tributes as the actor who had worked with Helen more than almost any other actor, appearing in seven different films, shows and plays together. Damian and Helen’s daughter Manon, 15, delivered a touching reading and son Gulliver, 14, played the guitar for guests at the ceremony.

You can see part of the event programme from Mr. Cavendish’s tweet below.  Bob Dylan’s To Be Alone with You was featured and a film titled In Her Own Words played. One cannot help remember that Helen chose To Be Alone with You as one of her favorite tunes during a recent segment of Desert Island Discs and she added that she had a blank check from Damian to run away with Bob Dylan. A close friend who attended the memorial service said, “It was just the most beautiful memorial. It was very touching. Speechless.”

View images of memorial service attendees in our Gallery here.

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Categories Books Fanart Print Media

Damian Lewis Caricature Featured in Celebrity London Tube Map Book

Stars on the Tube: Who’s Famous at YOUR Station?

by Bridget Galton | Hamstead & Highgate | May 19, 2022

Cartoonist Simon Ellinas has created a book of 272 caricatures of celebrities associated with each Tube stop, detailing their connections to each area. Simon Ellinas first started doing caricatures of his teachers as a Hampstead Schoolboy.

And after training at Harrow Art School of Art, the former St. Anthony’s and UCS pupil enjoyed a career as a cartoonist and illustrator for magazines and newspapers – including drawing caricatures for the nationals.

Now he has published his “lockdown project” which puts a famous face to every underground stop. The Barnet resident researched each destination, but says while areas like Hampstead (Ricky Gervais) and Highgate (Karl Marx) had “lots of possibilities” other celebrity connections were “more tenuous”.

“Once you get out onto the fringes you’re scrabbling around to find someone. For the new station at Nine Elms I chose Joanna Lumley because she was said to shop there. But most of them have strong connections, they were born, live, work or in the case of Dylan Thomas in Camden, they drank there – he drank in a lot of places, but I chose Camden Town.”

BBC correspondent Katya Adler was assigned Swiss Cottage because she attended South Hampstead High School. Martin Freeman is Belsize Park because “I heard he lived there.” Actor Damian Lewis lives in Tufnell Park, and Ray Davies is Archway, because Muswell Hill doesn’t have a tube stop and The Kinks played the Archway Tavern. Meanwhile Rolling Stone Keith Richards graces St. John’s Wood because “he wrote I Can’t Get No Satisfaction there in the 60s”, and Helena Bonham Carter grew up around Golders Green.

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Categories Magazine Print Media

People Magazine: Star Tracks

A Couple of Old Friends

by Staff | People Magazine | May 9, 2022

Photo: David M. Benett/Getty

From Hollywood to New York and everywhere in between, see what your favorite stars are up to in this week’s Star Tracks of People Magazine. Damian and Helena Bonham Carter were featured in the column, stating this couple of old friends attended the gala afterparty in aid of Stephen Sondheim Foundation held May 3, 2022 in London.

Read the rest of the original article at People Magazine

Categories Charity Old Friends Philanthropy Review Theatre

THE TIMES REVIEW: Sondheim’s ‘Old Friends’

Five Stars: A Star-Spangled, Unforgettable Tribute to Stephen Sondheim

by Clive Davis | The Times | May 4, 2022

Photo: Danny Kaan

Excuse me if I gush, but this was one of those nights where it was difficult to focus on highlights simply because there were so many. Cameron Mackintosh’s memorial concert for Stephen Sondheim, who died in November, began on a high note when the veteran Julia McKenzie, who did so much to champion the composer’s work on this side of the Pond, walked onto the stage to sing Side by Side by Side. Proof, if needed, that British artists don’t need to feel like intruders on this territory. They’ve made the music their own.

McKenzie’s appearance was the kind of moment which, in normal circumstances, would crown a memorable evening. In this case it was just the prelude. Of course, it was all the more fitting that this gala concert for the Stephen Sondheim Foundation was happening at the theatre (formerly known as the Queen’s) that bears the artist’s name. In his opening speech, Mackintosh wryly quipped that the twisted ankle that had prevented the great man from attending the opening in 2020 had just been an excuse to avoid having to sit through Les Misérables.

After Mackintosh had his say, the songs began to flow, with no host to cause any longueurs. Matthew Bourne and Maria Friedman — who shared directing credits — managed to cram in an immense range of material. Meanwhile, the cheering and the applause grew louder and louder. It reached its peak, perhaps, in a comic version of Broadway Baby, which began with McKenzie pretending to audition with a surly pianist before being joined by a blowsy pack of rivals including Bernadette Peters, Bonnie Langford and an insouciant Helena Bonham Carter.

Imelda Staunton sang Everything’s Coming Up Roses. Who else but Judi Dench could be entrusted with Send in the Clowns? If Dench’s delivery barely rose above a whisper, Haydn Gwynne powered through a version of The Ladies Who Lunch that was as potent and savage and tipsy as anything the late Elaine Stritch gave us. A twinkle-eyed Damian Lewis joined in the party too, kicking and shimmying his way through the risqué Everybody Ought to Have a Maid alongside Rob Brydon, Julian Ovenden and a mischievous Sian Phillips. As ever, the elegant Janie Dee glowed in the dark, sizzling through the bossa nova parody The Boy Friend.

Read the rest of the original article at The Times

Categories Charity Old Friends Philanthropy Review Theatre

LONDON THEATRE REVIEW: Sondheim’s ‘Old Friends’

A Tribute for the Ages

by Matt Wolf | London Theatre | May 4, 2022

“He’s left us with an impossible choice.” So the impresario Cameron Mackintosh told an entirely rapt crowd near the start of Old Friends, the one-off celebration of Stephen Sondheim that took place across three unforgettable hours May 3 at the Sondheim Theatre on the West End. “Impossible” because the legendary composer-lyricist left behind a capacious back catalogue when he died last November, age 91, not to mention a longlist of people who will forever be associated with his work.

Mackintosh, heralding an array of talent ranging from the “young to the ever young”, kicked off an evening rife with cheers and ovations on what, we were told, was one day shy of the 46th anniversary of the London premiere of Side By Side By Sondheim. That musical revue, produced by a then 29-year-old Mackintosh, helped bring Sondheim to the attention of the British, who have revered him ever since.

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